Amy Biehl Foundation 

@4 weeks ago

Relationships: Self Reflection

Four years. Ups and downs. Ebbs and flows. A great relationship… I mean we both loved each other. That’s a great relationship, right? Well, great and perfection is subjective. I wanted to make it work. I wanted to keep him in my pocket. I wanted him to grow into shoes that weren’t fit for him. After four years, I did not imagine Delise without him, but that was my selfish devil speaking. One day one of my great friends told me something that stuck with me until this day. 

We were sitting down on a bench in The Valley on campus. I was crying. I was hysterical. My friend looked me in the eyes and say, “Delise, do not continue to fall in love with his potential.” His potential? In the moment, I defended him, but once I got into the sacred confines of my own thoughts, I realized… He was right. 

My selfish ideals of what I wanted, who I needed… I neglected what I was doing to him. I was holding him back rather than helping him grow. I was becoming his everything. I didn’t realize that HE would have to realize his own potential and strengths in order for us to ever be in a great relationship, so I mustered up the confidence and I let go. 

I let go because he needed to find self love more than he needed my love. He needed to stop being who I wanted him to be and start to become who he ought to be. Now, after a couple months of no talking, no texting, no calling, it is safe to say I feel better now. 

So, women and men stop holding them back and make an effort to make them better. Trust me, it won’t hurt. It will just be a flame that you all will either rekindle or let burn. Nevertheless, both of you will be changed. 

Much Love & Admiration 

 

@3 months ago

"I am not African because I was born in Africa but because Africa was born in me"

Kwame Nkrumah
@3 months ago
@3 months ago
-Edel Rodriguez 

-Edel Rodriguez 

@3 months ago

"I’m tired of hearing about slavery"

Watching the movie, 12 Years A Slave, has brought up a pressing issue that needs to be addressed. 

"I’m tired of hearing about slavery." A quote from various people from all walks of life who are tired of hearing about their own History…  An effect institutionally moderated on the terms of keeping us slaves to our own minds. After fully digesting the pill of slavery, I began to look at the state of the African American community. What has really changed? Everything we think are slave thoughts - what we wear, what we eat, how we eat, when we ear, where we eat, how we wear it, where we go, what we buy, how we act, when we live, what we watch, how can we make it out here alive, what we think of each other, how we perceive people from other parts of the world, etc. Who can truly say that they think for themselves? Even the conscious have to find ways to maneuver through the system without becoming a prisoner. 

The state of the Black family structure, the Black male, the Black female, and the children in society today project the effects of slavery. It is quite a pity that we have become so numb to our oppression that even when the facts are blatantly in our face, we are still unable to identify the victims as our ancestors. Let’s reclaim slavery as ours and begin to heal our community. 

Much Love & Admiration 

 

@3 months ago
"No matter the color of your stripes, you can outlive the whips." -AmRak
Nelson Mandela, I feel a connection to you. I have known you. I have never met you, but the principles you guided your life by are the epitome of my existence. United for the inclusion of All without any exceptions. A true change maker. May you rest as your legacy will always live on. 
Much Love & Admiration

"No matter the color of your stripes, you can outlive the whips." -AmRak

Nelson Mandela, I feel a connection to you. I have known you. I have never met you, but the principles you guided your life by are the epitome of my existence. United for the inclusion of All without any exceptions. A true change maker. May you rest as your legacy will always live on. 

Much Love & Admiration

@3 months ago with 1 note

Mantra

"Empty pockets never held back anyone. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that." If there is not a sense of idleness in your being then you are destined for greatness. Help me in my pursuit to changing the world by donating to my online fundraising campaign "Amrak to Africa" at the link below: 

http://www.gofundme.com/amraktoafrica

Much Love & Admiration 

@3 months ago

Lucille Clifton 

Presenting “Aunt Jemima” and “Afterblues.” 

-Poetic beauty 

@3 months ago

"Special education is legalized mis-education"

Dr. Umar Johnson 
@3 months ago with 3 notes

Locs are simply BEAUTIFUL! 

(Source: lovedivika, via creepykitty)

@3 months ago with 421 notes

Mike Tyson: Kicks his Habit  

Don’t think of your new year resolution as simply an one-time quick fix to all your problems. There needs to be a daily commitment to the end result. Here, Mike Tyson speaks about how he is still battles to overcome, but he is sure that “this is the best I’ve ever felt.” Dedicate yourself to kicking one habit to the curb and you can change your life. 

@3 months ago

"We are anti-nobody. We are pro-Afrika. We breath„we dream,we live Afrika; because Afrika and humanity are inseparable."

Mangaliso Sobukwe
@3 months ago with 1 note

Nikky Finney: The poet of eloquent words for not-so-eloquent times 

A poem that grabs your heart for its reality and your mind for its imagery.

I am a Hurricane Katrina Survivor. I was there before the evacuation calls rang. I was there when the city was a ghost town. I was there when the wind and rain came washing the streets. I was there the day after… when the sun shined as bright as the moon. I was there - stranded. 

Much Love & Admiration 

 

@3 months ago

Kanye West: The Mogul without a Muzzle  

I know. I know. Kanye West, really? Haven’t we talked enough about him? Well, I am a fan of the Kanye then and now. Although many may say he has gone off the deep end, I beg to differ. There is an acute responsibility of those that have gained and secured a voice in America - particularly, African Americans. Kanye West has not changed. Even though I do not fully support his actions, (i.e. selling confederate flag tee shirts) I do agree with what he is trying to get the public to understand; however, he needs a muzzle until he figures out his action plan. Now, he is still the same, but he faces a dilemma. 

There is truth in the phrase, “It’s not about what you say, it’s about how you say it.” Kanye’s dilemma lies in the latter part of that phrase. He speaks the truth, but he is having a hard time being able to “dumb” his message down, so that people will understand what he is saying. He is saying that we need to pay close attention to what we spend our hard earned dollars on and what companies we support. He often alludes to Ralph Lauren and Nike because these are companies that African Americans, particularly, spend more, but they are either refusing his artistry or putting it into a box of “urban wear.” Although this may seem like a “rich” man problem, it is not. It happens much too often with everything - where the genius ideas are appropriated or boxed into being nothing more, nothing less. Instead of the appropriators giving credit where credit is due, there is a robbing of ideas or exclusion of ideas from the mainstream because they are deemed to be sub par. It happened with history, music, dance, poetry, etc. The lists go on. Kanye is just having a hard time with creating a message which is universally understood.

He has created a narcissistic image of himself that is contradictory to what his previous albums or art stood for. However, when he speaks about himself so highly and divinely, he is essentially referring to African Americans. He did not come from a family of narcissism. He came from activism. He is an artist, a controversial artist because of his activist mindset. As an activist, there is an acute responsibility to the community. Affecting change is one of those. Kanye West is attempting to affect change in the way minds think about clothing, fashion, art, power, and the significance of wealth in a community. However, as I mentioned before, he is struggling with his delivery. Quite frankly, the frustration in his tone comes from his knowledge base of the inhumane struggles of oppressed people. Considering myself an activist, there are times where you consider going Cray Cray because of the atrocities against Africans and Africans of the Diaspora and the inability of our voice being heard. I think this is his moment of Cray Cray. So before we shun him from being an activist for our liberation, look beyond his hard exterior and gain a deeper knowledge for what his artistry represents. He will not suppress his ideas or opinions for the satisfaction of others, but he has to get the the critics to comprehend his frustrations. He is a mogul without a muzzle. 

Much Love & Admiration

@3 months ago